Saturday, July 22, 2017

Light and Dark



Changes were made to two of the paintings so here they are again in the gallery. 

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Ocean to Desert and Back Again



Just when I thought living in a sea side town was firmly in my past and not in my future, here I am again. Maybe it took being gone to appreciate the parts of it that had stopped being interesting to me.  Living in the dry hills of a desert was a billion times more interesting and fun than I ever thought it would be----to live a traffic-free California  life is something to consider, and by California-life I refer to good roads and grocery stores that carry everything-----but the intense summer heat, even though somehow it didn't bother me much, still went on for such a long period that it became a bit grim. Temperatures over 100 that persist more than 100 straight days have a way of wearing you down.  And the winter weather was bone chilling in a way I hadn't anticipated, something about the lack of moisture in the air I guess. Friends from Canada and England who came to visit in the winter time were freezing the whole time and looked on the frigid temperature as a betrayal of sorts, a mirage. Deserts are supposed to be warm. That's what they had aimed for when they planned their trip. The Canadians said, "I'm freezing!!"  The visitors from England said, "I'm frightfully cold." 

Also I'm in a different art gallery than when I lived here before, so that's a new change. I'm looking forward to it all. It's nice. Change is good. Also the fish market is close by again so I can keep painting fish. I can go in with the Asian women and pick and choose and smell and touch, than grab what I want with a fishy hand and shove it in a bag and plop down at the cash register. In the desert that was the one thing you couldn't get----a fresh, slippery, floppy fish. I have so many ideas I want to work on !!!!! 

This one is 18"24", they were little shashimo, a type of sardine like fish that has a quantity of roe inside and they are fried up quickly and eaten. As fish they are beauitful to look at and have a pronounced round eye and angled mouth, like tiny barracuda. 

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Today it has been cold in the morning, raining much of the day so far, but still pretty out the sun comes and goes. 

My work is representational. To try to improve myself I work on abstract compositions periodically. I love it. I don't see the difference between creating that kind of work and representational work, at least not in the way some other people seem to. 

Some artists that I knew were going to an art show that was showing  both representational and abstract paintings. They came back so critical of the abstract pieces, to the point of venom, that I decided to go to the same show to see for myself. The artists had complained about the emptiness of the modern pieces---'a child could do it'---etc., but on seeing the various work myself, I didn't sense that.  It seemed to me that in many cases the artists of the abstract pieces appeared to have put more thought into their work than the representational artists had. It's impossible to say. But sometimes you look at things and think, "Another one." I HATE looking at my own stuff and thinking that!!! But it happens, it happens, and that's life.  Anyway, without knowing any of the artists involved, my cold blooded assessment was that some of the abstract pieces showed some real inspiration and thought, and I didn't see that happening with the the representational things at that particular show. And I walked away with a few ideas about ideas for representational work for myself, that were inspired by the abstract pieces and not the traditional representational pieces that I saw. 




We live in a very good time for artists now, because so much is available to learn. (Yay for the Internet and YouTube and workshops galore) The only trouble is the extremely odd economy, so that now artists are very often making their living from other artists (workshops galore).Even the plein-air group shows, firmly anchored in the representational world, have hit on the profitable idea of often having a drastic size limitation---sometimes insisting on miniatures basically----in order for the exhibition to display the maximum number of paintings....and collect the maximum number of entry fees. The walls are then hung chock-a-block with identically sized paintings, four or five inches in diameter, looking itself like a grid---or like a vast wall-sized piece of abstract art.